Syria: the implications for British and American politics.

Given the comprehensive case against NATO intervention in Syria, as made yesterday, the response from the both the British political establishment and the electorate has been appalling. The government has failed to condemn America’s actions, preferring to curry favour with the Trump administration in the hope of a good trade deal post-Brexit. The Liberal Democrats, …

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Syria: Why intervention is not the answer.

The ongoing civil war in Syria is a mess, in which there is no obvious solution to. The Western consensus is that the intentional killing of innocent civilians by the Assad regime without impunity, is a state of affairs that cannot be allowed to continue. Assad has repeatedly denied his citizens basic human rights. The …

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Israel, Europe, and the corrosive effects of nationalism.

This week’s post is a response to an article in The Spectator published just a few days ago, in which Seth Frantzman argues that the European right increasingly resembles its Israeli counterparts. He writes, “For Israelis, Europe’s political landscape is looking increasingly familiar. Whereas Israel was once seen as something of a political backwater, nowadays it’s European …

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Has the socialist left come to accept liberal globalisation?

I wouldn’t normally post more than once a week. But a friend of mine has shared an article I think couldn’t be more relevant. The Financial Times’ Janan Ganesh argues that the rise of anti-globalisation right wing populists like Trump and the pro-Brexit campaigners, have inadvertently made social democrats defend the neoliberal global order they …

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Northern Ireland: where moderation is a rarity.

It’s often said that American politics is increasingly polarised. Republicans and Democrats vote on party lines more frequently, with dissenters being scorned as ideologically impure. Many academics believe this polarisation has been an elite phenomenon, with most ordinary Americans maintaining relatively centrist views. But even if America’s stark political divisions are purely the failure’s of …

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