Epicurus and the Alt-Right

This post marks the return of my  Modern Philosophy series, in which I talk about the most prominent ideas facing the modern world from an Epicurean perspective. After this post, I have at least three more Modern Philosophies to cover, which I’ll be writing on weekly instead of fortnightly, so look out for that!  After World War …

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Best of the Week #12 Emmanuel Macron in perspective

Before the most recent French elections, I recommended that French people vote for Emmanuel Macron in what was my first ever post for this blog http://hanrott.com/blog/why-epicurean-frenchmen-should-vote-for-macron/. Having won the election by a greater than expected margin, I thought I would examine how his presidency has gone so far. I should start by saying that I do …

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Best of the Week #11 The potential pitfalls of a US-UK trade deal

Apologies for posting this late, I had to reinstall Mac OS onto my laptop because it wasn’t working.  Awhile ago, Donald Trump tweeted his enthusiasm for a US-UK trade deal. Inevitably, Brexiteers were ecstatic. Here was irrefutable proof the UK wouldn’t suffer any loss of trade after Brexit. Trade with the US and other countries would …

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Walt Whitman on the Democratic Party

Nowadays it is the Democrats who are (ahem!) the high- minded crowd, compared with their competition, the Republicans. Times change. This is Whitman ‘s take on the Democratic Party Convention in the US in the 1850s: “The members who composed it were, seven-eights of them, the meanest kind of bawling and blowing office-holders, office- seekers, …

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Winning by exhausting the opposition

This has never previously been seen anywhere else, and in any era, and is truly historic: subversion- by- exhaustion. I refer to the White House strategy of disgusting and exasperating all normal, decent supporters of thoughtful, informed and grown-up government, with the objective of getting them to stop paying attention to the daily, endless, infuriating …

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The lessons of history – known and learned, or cast aside?

This last Sunday marked  the centenary of the Battle of Passchendaele – one of the bloodiest of World War One.   Officially known as the Third Battle of Ypres, Passchendaele was fought between 31 July and 6 November 1917 in the West Flanders region of northern Belgium. About 275,000 Allied troops and 220,000 Germans died.   …

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Is Corbyn really all that different from Blair?

Sorry for yet another long post on British politics. This will be the last one for a while, I promise. Starting with this Sunday’s Best of the Week, I’m going to be less political for the time being.  Jeremy Corbyn and his supporters love to differentiate themselves from the legacy of former British prime minister …

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Best of the Week #7

As a continuation from last week’s post, I thought recommending fewer posts but analysing them in more detail would be a good idea. Today I have selected an interview with David French, a columnist for the American conservative National Review magazine, about Trump and the general state of the Republican Party. https://www.vox.com/2017/7/13/15958230/donald-trump-jr-russia-collusion-republican-party-david-french French is remarkably honest …

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